Episode 16: Pathways to Sustainable Food Systems


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Achieving more sustainable food systems is a messy business because the stakes are so high for all involved. In this episode, we look at the state of food systems generally, and then critically analyze pathways towards sustainability for the food systems of Canada and Africa with our guests, Helena Shilomboleni, PhD, CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) East Africa at the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi, Kenya, and Sarah J. Martin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Memorial University. Together, they help us understand the relationship between different food systems and the climate emergency, as well as the opportunities and challenges facing farmers who are pursuing more earth-friendly approaches rooted in agroecology.


Guest

Helena Shilomboleni
CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) East Africa, International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya

Guest Bios

Guest

Sarah J. Martin
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Memorial University

Guest Bios

Host

Peter Andrée
Professor, Department of Political Science, Carleton University

Episode Audio & Video

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Guest Bios

Helena Shilomboleni

Helena Shilomboleni is a Postdoctoral Fellow and Scaling Specialist with the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) East Africa region. Her research broadly examines how best to achieve food security among Africa’s smallholder farmers in a manner that is both sustainable and equitable and has analyzed contributions from the African Green Revolution and the Food Sovereignty Movement. In recent years, her work focuses on international development efforts to scale up climate-smart innovations in smallholder food and agricultural systems under the new realities of climate change.

Sarah J. Martin

Sarah J. Martin specializes in the global political economy of food and agriculture. Her work as a cook, chef and meat cutter in a variety of settings from cafeterias to high-end restaurants to remote logging camps has led to an interest in how food politics is practiced in the everyday. She is currently researching the dynamics of food, feed and fuel in relation to environmental politics, and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Memorial University.