Episode 2.11: Growth, Degrowth, Agrowth

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What is the relationship between economic growth and the environment? What is 'green growth' and why does the degrowth movement oppose it? And what does it mean to be agnostic about growth in the context of sustainability? In this episode we speak with two scholars who approach these questions from a degrowth perspective - Dr. Susan Paulson from the University of Florida, and Dr. Bengi Akbulut, from Concordia University in Canada. The episode also delves into Global South perspecitves on the growth-environment debate.


Host

Ryan M. Katz-Rosene
Assistant Professor, School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa

Guest

Susan Paulson
Professor of Latin American Studies, University of Florida

Guest Bios

Guest

Bengi Akbulut
Assistant Professor, Geography, Planning and Environment, Concordia University

Guest Bios

Episode Audio & Video

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Guest Bios

Susan Paulson

Susan Paulson explores how class, gender, and ethnoracial systems interact with environments. She has researched and taught in Latin America for thirty years, fifteen of those living in South America among low-impact communities. Currently based at the University of Florida, Susan delights in conversation across difference within and beyond the classroom, and especially in workshops she has facilitated in 15 countries. Some aspects of a collaborative learning journey are discussed in her article Pluriversal learning: Pathways toward a world of many worlds. Susan participates in Feminisms and Degrowth Alliance (FaDA), has written on Degrowth: culture, power and change, and co-authored The Case for Degrowth. Her ongoing learning about changing relations between masculinities and environment in varied Latin American contexts is shared in books written in Spanish and in English.

Bengi Akbulut

Bengi Akbulut is an assistant professor at the department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Concordia University. She received her B.A. from Bogazici University, Istanbul (2004), and PhD from University of Massachusetts at Amherst (2011), both in economics. Her joint and independent work appeared in the Cambridge Journal of Economics, Journal of Peasant Studies, Development and Change, Environment and Planning, Ecological Economics, and Geoforum among others. Her research is broadly within political economy and ecological economics. She has written on the critiques of developmentalism and economic growth in general, and the interlinks between developmentalism and state hegemony in Turkey in particular. A significant part of her work within the last 5 years has focused on economic alternatives, including community economies, commons and degrowth.